ShikshaLokam

ShikshaLokam’s Prototyping Recipe

Imagine a bright, sunny Sunday morning. You have invited your friends over for brunch. As you consider what to cook, you spot those juicy, red tomatoes on the counter, and you’re instantly taken back to your mom’s famous red sauce pasta. After an hour in the kitchen, the pasta is made, and the sauce is slowly coming to a boil. You add a pinch of salt, pepper for the heat, and some garnish to complement the tanginess of the tomatoes flawlessly.  

Before you serve it, you want to make sure that everything is perfect. You take a spoonful of the sauce to taste and offer some to your roommate too.  This little test helps you to refine the pasta with the same heavenly feeling that you got when your mom made it for you.

You are now sure that it is nothing less than perfection. All you have to do now is sit back and let the compliments pour in!

What Is A Prototype?

Just like how tasting is an integral process of cooking, prototyping is an integral part of design. Through a prototype, a design can be brought to life and shared with users who can give real-time feedback on its effectiveness which then allows the designer to refine the design and set it up for success before finalizing. 

A prototype is a simple experimental model of a proposed solution used to test or validate ideas, design assumptions and other aspects of its conceptualization quickly so that the designer/s involved can make appropriate refinements or possible changes in direction. (Source: Interaction Design Foundation)

Why Do We Need To Prototype?

Prototyping is an essential step in designing and developing that allows for necessary course correction before the final launch. A prototype can be tested out to gauge the relevance of the product for users, and necessary changes can be made before the final product is released. This small yet crucial step can save a lot of resources that would otherwise be spent on redesigning the product.

Meet the Authors

Sanjana DM

Sanjana DM

Sanjana has always been a firm believer in the power of effective design to drive meaningful change. Her interest in travel, music, art & culture inspires her to think beyond the conventional. A former Teach for India fellow, she currently works with ShikshaLokam to design product solutions for education leaders across the country.

Sanjana DM

Sanjana DM

Sanjana has always been a firm believer in the power of effective design to drive meaningful change. Her interest in travel, music, art & culture inspires her to think beyond the conventional. A former Teach for India fellow, she currently works with ShikshaLokam to design product solutions for education leaders across the country.

Sakshi Rawat

Sakshi Rawat

Sakshi is a passionate development sector professional with a deep interest in design thinking, education leadership, working with children from vulnerable communities, and gender and sexuality. As a Program Design & Research Lead at Shikshalokam, she designs innovative and scalable programs for school leaders across Telangana and Punjab, guided by her belief in user-first. Her dedication to creating user-centric solutions has led her to lead multiple prototype exercises and lead qualitative research projects for school leaders at Shikshalokam. When she is not working, you can find Sakshi spending time doing mixed martial arts, traveling, and tending to her kitchen garden.

Sakshi Rawat

Sakshi Rawat

Sakshi is a passionate development sector professional with a deep interest in design thinking, education leadership, working with children from vulnerable communities, and gender and sexuality. As a Program Design & Research Lead at Shikshalokam, she designs innovative and scalable programs for school leaders across Telangana and Punjab, guided by her belief in user-first. Her dedication to creating user-centric solutions has led her to lead multiple prototype exercises and lead qualitative research projects for school leaders at Shikshalokam. When she is not working, you can find Sakshi spending time doing mixed martial arts, traveling, and tending to her kitchen garden.

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